Engineering Grade 2 @ Brunswick Acres

During this cycle, students learned about Engineering and the Engineering Design Process. They learned that engineers think creatively about solving problems and responding to challenges that exist in our world.  Students also learned that engineers follow the steps of the Engineering Design Process to solve these problems: AskImaginePlanCreate and Improve.

Students were presented with a challenge to design a bird nest for a wildlife rescue. The nest would need to be  large enough to hold 4 eggs (marbles).  Before beginning their design, students learned about different types of bird nests and how birds construct their nest.

Challenge:  Using what you know about bird nests, create a nest that will safely hold four eggs.  The nest must meet the following criteria:

• Be large enough to hold four eggs (marbles)

• Must be made with at least 3 of the provided materials, but not more than 5

• Must have a way for the bird to get into it

• Must be sturdy/stable enough to withstand being lifted from the aluminum pan

Materials: shredded paper, newsprint, string, twine, yarn, ribbon, feathers, chenille stems, twigs, straws, scissors, glue and clay

Using the steps of the Engineering Design Process, students worked in teams to complete the challenge.

Designs:

Engineering Grade 2 @ Brooks Crossing

During this cycle, students learned about Engineering and the Engineering Design Process. They learned that engineers think creatively about solving problems and responding to challenges that exist in our world.  Students also learned that engineers follow the steps of the Engineering Design Process to solve these problems: AskImaginePlanCreate and Improve.

Students were presented with a challenge to design a bird nest for a wildlife rescue. The nest would need to be  large enough to hold 4 eggs (marbles).  Before beginning their design, students learned about different types of bird nests and how birds construct their nest.

Challenge:  Using what you know about bird nests, create a nest that will safely hold four eggs.  The nest must meet the following criteria:

• Be large enough to hold four eggs (marbles)

• Must be made with at least 3 of the provided materials, but not more than 5

• Must have a way for the bird to get into it

• Must be sturdy/stable enough to withstand being lifted from the aluminum pan

Materials: shredded paper, newsprint, string, twine, yarn, ribbon, feathers, chenille stems, twigs, straws, scissors, glue and clay

Using the steps of the Engineering Design Process, students worked in teams to complete the challenge.

Designs:

Engineering Grade 2 @ Monmouth Junction

During this cycle, students learned about Engineering and the Engineering Design Process. They learned that engineers think creatively about solving problems and responding to challenges that exist in our world.  Students also learned that engineers follow the steps of the Engineering Design Process to solve these problems: AskImaginePlanCreate and Improve.

Students were presented with a challenge to design a bird nest for a wildlife rescue. The nest would need to be  large enough to hold 4 eggs (marbles).  Before beginning their design, students learned about different types of bird nests and how birds construct their nest.

Challenge:  Using what you know about bird nests, create a nest that will safely hold four eggs.  The nest must meet the following criteria:

• Be large enough to hold four eggs (marbles)

• Must be made with at least 3 of the provided materials, but not more than 5

• Must have a way for the bird to get into it

• Must be sturdy/stable enough to withstand being lifted from the aluminum pan

Materials: shredded paper, newsprint, string, twine, yarn, ribbon, feathers, chenille stems, twigs, straws, scissors, glue and clay

Using the steps of the Engineering Design Process, students worked in teams to complete the challenge.

Designs:

Engineering Grade 2 @ Constable

During this cycle, students learned about Engineering and the Engineering Design Process. They learned that engineers think creatively about solving problems and responding to challenges that exist in our world.  Students also learned that engineers follow the steps of the Engineering Design Process to solve these problems: AskImaginePlanCreate and Improve.

Students were presented with a challenge to design a bird nest for a wildlife rescue. The nest would need to be  large enough to hold 4 eggs (marbles).  Before beginning their design, students learned about different types of bird nests and how birds construct their nest.

Challenge:  Using what you know about bird nests, create a nest that will safely hold four eggs.  The nest must meet the following criteria:

• Be large enough to hold four eggs (marbles)

• Must be made with at least 3 of the provided materials, but not more than 5

• Must have a way for the bird to get into it

• Must be sturdy/stable enough to withstand being lifted from the aluminum pan

Materials: shredded paper, newsprint, string, twine, yarn, ribbon, feathers, chenille stems, twigs, straws, scissors, glue and clay

Using the steps of the Engineering Design Process, students worked in teams to complete the challenge.

Designs:

Engineering Grade 2 @ Greenbrook

During this cycle, students learned about Engineering and the Engineering Design Process. They learned that engineers think creatively about solving problems and responding to challenges that exist in our world.  Students also learned that engineers follow the steps of the Engineering Design Process to solve these problems: AskImaginePlanCreate and Improve.

Students were presented with a challenge to design a bird nest for a wildlife rescue. The nest would need to be  large enough to hold 4 eggs (marbles).  Before beginning their design, students learned about different types of bird nests and how birds construct their nest.

Challenge:  Using what you know about bird nests, create a nest that will safely hold four eggs.  The nest must meet the following criteria:

• Be large enough to hold four eggs (marbles)

• Must be made with at least 3 of the provided materials, but not more than 5

• Must have a way for the bird to get into it

• Must be sturdy/stable enough to withstand being lifted from the aluminum pan

Materials: shredded paper, newsprint, string, twine, yarn, ribbon, feathers, chenille stems, twigs, straws, scissors, glue and clay

Using the steps of the Engineering Design Process, students worked in teams to complete the challenge.

Designs:

Engineering 2nd Grade @ Indian Fields

During this cycle, students learned about Engineering and the Engineering Design Process. They learned that engineers think creatively about solving problems and responding to challenges that exist in our world.  Students also learned that engineers follow the steps of the Engineering Design Process to solve these problems: AskImaginePlanCreate and Improve.

Students were presented with a challenge to design a bird nest for a wildlife rescue. The nest would need to be  large enough to hold 4 eggs (marbles).  Before beginning their design, students learned about different types of bird nests and how birds construct their nest.

Challenge:  Using what you know about bird nests, create a nest that will safely hold four eggs.  The nest must meet the following criteria:

• Be large enough to hold four eggs (marbles)

• Must be made with at least 3 of the provided materials, but not more than 5

• Must have a way for the bird to get into it

• Must be sturdy/stable enough to withstand being lifted from the aluminum pan

Materials: shredded paper, newsprint, string, twine, yarn, ribbon, feathers, chenille stems, twigs, straws, scissors, glue and clay

Using the steps of the Engineering Design Process, students worked in teams to complete the challenge.

Designs:

Engineering 2nd Grade @ Cambridge

During this cycle, students learned about Engineering and the Engineering Design Process. They learned that engineers think creatively about solving problems and responding to challenges that exist in our world.  Students also learned that engineers follow the steps of the Engineering Design Process to solve these problems:  Ask, Imagine, Plan, Create and Improve.

Students were presented with a challenge to design a bird nest for a wildlife rescue. The nest would need to be  large enough to hold 4 eggs (marbles).  Before beginning their design, students learned about different types of bird nests and how birds construct their nest.

Challenge:  Using what you know about bird nests, create a nest that will safely hold four eggs.  The nest must meet the following criteria:

• Be large enough to hold four eggs (marbles)

• Must be made with at least 3 of the provided materials, but not more than 5

• Must have a way for the bird to get into it

• Must be sturdy/stable enough to withstand being lifted from the aluminum pan

Materials: shredded paper, newsprint, string, twine, yarn, ribbon, feathers, chenille stems, twigs, straws, scissors, glue and clay

Using the steps of the Engineering Design Process, students worked in teams to complete the challenge.

Designs:

Digital Literacy 2nd Grade

Cycle 3 focused on Language Arts & Digital Communication.  Second grade students read and analyzed a traditional fairy tale and a fractured fairy tale. They learned about point of view, and how it impacts the ways in which stories are told.  After reading both versions, students were text detectives and searched for evidence in both texts to determine who was the real antagonist.  The students recorded their supporting evidence on a graphic organizer.  Using information gained from reading, the students used “Google Drawing” to create Wanted posters for the antagonist.  Check out their Wanted posters and help us convict the characters of their crimes!

Please click on the student’s first name below to view their work.

Indian Fields:

Juhi’s Wanted Poster

Anand’s Wanted Poster 

Arya’s Wanted Poster

Rishab’s Waned Poster

Adhya’s Wanted Poster

Tyler’s Wanted Poster

Ajay’s Wanted Poster

Anvi’s Wanted Poster

Kirtan’s Wanted Poster

Cambridge:

Rohith’s Wanted Poster

Audrey’s Wanted Poster

Ria’s Wanted Poster

Rigvi’s Wanted Poster

Catherine’s Wanted Poster

Aarav’s Wanted Poster

Varsha’s Wanted Poster

Pihu’s Wanted Poster 

Christian’s Wanted Poster 

Greenbrook:

Charlene’s Wanted Poster

Emma’s Wanted Poster

Riva’s Wanted Poster

Pritham’s Wanted Poster

Rishita’s Wanted Poster

Sara’s Wanted Poster

Constable:

Henry’s Wanted Poster

Srihita’s Wanted Poster

April’s Wanted Poster

Camryn’s Wanted Poster

Jayden’s Wanted Poster

Olyvia’s Wanted Poster

Orion’s Wanted Poster

Riley’s Wanted Poster

Vibikshya’s Wanted Poster

Monmouth Junction:

Adhithi’s Wanted Poster

Nicholas’ Wanted Poster

Gabriela’s Wanted Poster

Sreekar’s Wanted Poster

Pragna’s Wanted Poster

Tala’s Wanted Poster

Rhea’s Wanted Poster

Brooks Crossing:

Richa’s Wanted Poster

Neil’s Wanted Poster

Satvik’s Wanted Poster

Ranya’s Wanted Poster

Caleb’s Wanted Poster

Tanisha’s Wanted Poster

Megha’s Wanted Poster

Alaina’s Wanted Poster

Marilyn’s Wanted Poster

Brunswick Acres:

Ishaan’s Wanted Poster

Siri’s Wanted Poster

Rahul’s Wanted Poster

Farrah’s Wanted Poster

Angela’s Wanted Poster

Annika’s Wanted Poster

Alexandra’s Wanted Poster

 

 

Engineering 2nd Grade @ Constable

During this cycle, students learned about Engineering and the Engineering Design Process.  They learned that engineers think creatively about solving problems and responding to challenges that exist in our world.  Students also learned that engineers follow the steps of the Engineering Design Process to solve these problems:  Ask, Imagine, Plan, Create, and Improve.

Students began the cycle with a quick challenge in which they constructed a square and a triangle from marshmallows and toothpicks.  Students tested the strength of each shape and found that the triangle could withstand more pressure than the square.  Next, the students constructed a pyramid from the same materials and tested the strength of the pyramid.

Students were presented with a challenge to engineer a house (made from recycled materials) for the fourth little pig. The house would need to withstand the gusts of the Big Bad Wolf. Before beginning their design, students reviewed the story of The Three Little Pigs.  We discussed and compared materials used in each of the three designs from the story.  We then related this to the construction of our own homes and the importance of having a strong and sturdy design to withstand extreme weather conditions.

Challenge:  Using what you know about shapes, create a house that will protect the fourth little pig container. The house must meet the following criteria:

• The house must be large enough for the fourth little pig.

• It must be made from recycled materials.

• The house must have an entrance.

• The house must withstand the wind gusts generated by the Big Bad Wolf.

Materials: toothpicks, craft sticks, pasta (linguine), paper clips, straws, tape, cardboard, marshmallows, chenille stems, and scissors

Using the steps of the Engineering Design Process, students worked in teams to complete the challenge.

Designs:

On the last day, students presented their solutions and reflected on their work.  As a group, they defined what it means to be an engineer, and the character traits needed to be successful.

Engineering 2nd Grade @ Monmouth Junction

During this cycle, students learned about Engineering and the Engineering Design Process.  They learned that engineers think creatively about solving problems and responding to challenges that exist in our world.  Students also learned that engineers follow the steps of the Engineering Design Process to solve these problems:  Ask, Imagine, Plan, Create, and Improve.

Students began the cycle with a quick challenge in which they constructed a square and a triangle from marshmallows and toothpicks.  Students tested the strength of each shape and found that the triangle could withstand more pressure than the square.  Next, the students constructed a pyramid from the same materials and tested the strength of the pyramid.

Students were presented with a challenge to engineer a house (made from recycled materials) for the fourth little pig. The house would need to withstand the gusts of the Big Bad Wolf. Before beginning their design, students reviewed the story of The Three Little Pigs.  We discussed and compared materials used in each of the three designs from the story.  We then related this to the construction of our own homes and the importance of having a strong and sturdy design to withstand extreme weather conditions.

Challenge:  Using what you know about shapes, create a house that will protect the fourth little pig. The house must meet the following criteria:

• The house must be large enough for the fourth little pig.

• It must be made from recycled materials.

• The house must have an entrance.

• The house must withstand the wind gusts generated by the Big Bad Wolf.

Materials: toothpicks, craft sticks, pasta (linguine), paper clips, straws, tape, cardboard, marshmallows, chenille stems, and scissors

Using the steps of the Engineering Design Process, students worked in teams to complete the challenge.

Designs:

On the last day, students presented their solutions and reflected on their work.  As a group, they defined what it means to be an engineer, and the character traits needed to be successful.