Digital Literacy Gr. 4 @ Brunswick Acres

Cycle 3 focused on Language Arts and Digital Literacy.  The cycle began with a discussion about digital literacy and it’s importance in the 21st century.  Participants then learned about the elements of fables including character, setting, problem, resolution and lesson learned (moral). Students read and identified the elements of many fables.  They also performed selected fables in small groups for Reader’s Theater.  Students were then split into small teams and asked to create their own fable.  They started by thinking of a moral that they would like to include in their story, and planned their fables around that moral.   After completing their plans and drafting their stories, students used Storybird (a Web 2.0 Tool) to publish their work.   Storybird is a collaborative storytelling tool that allows students to publish short stories, chapter books and poetry.   We hope you enjoy their work!

(You will need to click on the title of the fable to open the story)

The Elephant and the Bunny

The Four Monkeys and the Crocodile

The Fox and the Hare

The Kingdom and the Crow

The Big Dangerous Ocean

The Cat Family and the Mouse

The Fox and the Bird

The Fox and the Owl Egg

 

 

Digital Literacy Gr. 3 @ Brooks Crossing

Cycle 3 focused on Language Arts and Digital Literacy.  The cycle began with a discussion about digital literacy and it’s importance in the 21st century.  Participants then learned about the elements of fables including character, setting, problem, resolution and lesson learned (moral).

Students read and identified the elements of many fables.  They also performed selected fables in small groups for Reader’s Theater.  Students were then split into small teams and asked to create their own fable.  They started by thinking of a moral that they would like to include in their story, and planned their fables around that moral.   After completing their plans and drafting their stories, students used Storybird (a Web 2.0 Tool) to publish their work.   Storybird is a collaborative storytelling tool that allows students to publish short stories, chapter books and poetry.   We hope you enjoy their work!

(You will need to click on the title of the fable to open the story)

The Fox, The Deer and the Hare

 

Digital Literacy Gr. 3 @ Monmouth Junction

Cycle 3 focused on Language Arts and Digital Literacy.  The cycle began with a discussion about digital literacy and it’s importance in the 21st century.  Participants then learned about the elements of fables including character, setting, problem, resolution and lesson learned (moral).

Students read and identified the elements of many fables.  They also performed selected fables in small groups for Reader’s Theater.  Students were then split into small teams and asked to create their own fable.  They started by thinking of a moral that they would like to include in their story, and planned their fables around that moral.   After completing their plans and drafting their stories, students used Storybird (a Web 2.0 Tool) to publish their work.   Storybird is a collaborative storytelling tool that allows students to publish short stories, chapter books and poetry.   We hope you enjoy their work!

(You will need to click on the title of the fable to open the story).

The Fox, Lion and The Bear

 

Digital Literacy Gr. 3 @ Greenbrook

Cycle 3 focused on Language Arts and Digital Literacy.  The cycle began with a discussion about digital literacy and it’s importance in the 21st century.  Participants then learned about the elements of fables including character, setting, problem, resolution and lesson learned (moral).

Students read and identified the elements of many fables.  They also performed selected fables in small groups for Reader’s Theater.  Students were then split into small teams and asked to create their own fable.  They started by thinking of a moral that they would like to include in their story, and planned their fables around that moral.   After completing their plans and drafting their stories, students used Storybird (a Web 2.0 Tool) to publish their work.   Storybird is a collaborative storytelling tool that allows students to publish short stories, chapter books and poetry.   We hope you enjoy their work!

(You will need to click on the title of the fable to open the story).

The Owl and the Wolves

 

The Cat, Fox and Snake

 

The Rabbit and the Reflection

Digital Literacy Gr. 3 @ Cambridge

Cycle 3 focused on Language Arts and Digital Literacy.  The cycle began with a discussion about digital literacy and it’s importance in the 21st century.  Participants then learned about the elements of fables including character, setting, problem, resolution and lesson learned (moral).

Students read and identified the elements of many fables.  They also performed selected fables in small groups for Reader’s Theater.  Students were then split into small teams and asked to create their own fable.  They started by thinking of a moral that they would like to include in their story, and planned their fables around that moral.   After completing their plans and drafting their stories, students used Storybird (a Web 2.0 Tool) to publish their work.   Storybird is a collaborative storytelling tool that allows students to publish short stories, chapter books and poetry.   We hope you enjoy their work!

(You will need to click on the title of the fable to open the story).

The Foolish Deer

 

The Squirrel and the Crocodile

 

The Greedy Wolf

 

The Famine In the Forest

 

The Fish, Bird and Deer

Digital Literacy Gr. 3 @ Indian Fields

Cycle 3 focused on Language Arts and Digital Literacy.  The cycle began with a discussion about digital literacy and it’s importance in the 21st century.  Participants then learned about the elements of fables including character, setting, problem, resolution and lesson learned (moral).

Students read and identified the elements of many fables.  They also performed selected fables in small groups for Reader’s Theater.  Students were then split into small teams and asked to create their own fable.  They started by thinking of a moral that they would like to include in their story, and planned their fables around that moral.   After completing their plans and drafting their stories, students used Storybird (a digital tool) to publish their work.   Storybird is a collaborative storytelling tool that allows students to publish short stories, chapter books and poetry.   We hope you enjoy their work!

(You will need to click on the title of the fable to open the story).

 The Race!

 

Engineering Gr. 3 @ Monmouth Junction

During this cycle, students learned about Engineering and the Engineering Design Process.  They learned that engineers think creatively about solving problems and responding to challenges that exist in our world.  Students also learned that engineers follow the steps of the Engineering Design Process to solve these problems:  Ask, Imagine, Plan, Create, and Improve.


Students were presented with a challenge to engineer a pet treat dispenser system. Before beginning their design, students learned about the lever (a simple machine) and gravity.  We researched different types of food and water dispensers currently available for pets.

Challenge:  Using what you know about levers and gravity, create a container for a dog treat that dispenses the treat. The container must meet the following criteria:

• The container must be large enough to hold one day’s worth of treats

• It must be able to dispense a treat when the animal steps on a lever or touches it with their nose or paw

• The treat should roll or fall out of the container into a small bowl

• Be totally enclosed so that the only way the treats are accessed is by using the lever

Materials: small cardboard box, cardboard, craft sticks, chenille stems, small springs, rubber bands, paper clips, tape, small bowl, unifix cubes to simulate dog treats and scissors

Using the steps of the Engineering Design Process, students worked in teams to complete the challenge.

Designs:

On the last day, students presented their solutions and reflected on their work.  As a group, they defined what it means to be an engineer, and the character traits needed to be successful.

Engineering Gr. 3 @ BA

During this cycle, students learned about Engineering and the Engineering Design Process.  They learned that engineers think creatively about solving problems and responding to challenges that exist in our world.  Students also learned that engineers follow the steps of the Engineering Design Process to solve these problems:  Ask, Imagine, Plan, Create, and Improve.


Students were presented with a challenge to engineer a pet treat dispenser system. Before beginning their design, students learned about the lever (a simple machine) and gravity.  We researched different types of food and water dispensers currently available for pets.

Challenge:  Using what you know about levers and gravity, create a container for a dog treat that dispenses the treat. The container must meet the following criteria:

• The container must be large enough to hold one day’s worth of treats

• It must be able to dispense a treat when the animal steps on a lever or touches it with their nose or paw

• The treat should roll or fall out of the container into a small bowl

• Be totally enclosed so that the only way the treats are accessed is by using the lever

Materials: small cardboard box, cardboard, craft sticks, chenille stems, small springs, rubber bands, paper clips, tape, small bowl, unifix cubes to simulate dog treats and scissors

Using the steps of the Engineering Design Process, students worked in teams to complete the challenge.

Designs:

On the last day, students presented their solutions and reflected on their work.  As a group, they defined what it means to be an engineer, and the character traits needed to be successful.

 

 

Engineering Gr. 3 @ CA

During this cycle, students learned about Engineering and the Engineering Design Process.  They learned that engineers think creatively about solving problems and responding to challenges that exist in our world.  Students also learned that engineers follow the steps of the Engineering Design Process to solve these problems:  Ask, Imagine, Plan, Create, and Improve.


Students were presented with a challenge to engineer a pet treat dispenser system. Before beginning their design, students learned about the lever (a simple machine) and gravity.  We researched different types of food and water dispensers currently available for pets.

Challenge:  Using what you know about levers and gravity, create a container for a dog treat that dispenses the treat. The container must meet the following criteria:

• The container must be large enough to hold one day’s worth of treats

• It must be able to dispense a treat when the animal steps on a lever or touches it with their nose or paw

• The treat should roll or fall out of the container into a small bowl

• Be totally enclosed so that the only way the treats are accessed is by using the lever

Materials: small cardboard box, cardboard, craft sticks, chenille stems, small springs, rubber bands, paper clips, tape, small bowl, unifix cubes to simulate dog treats and scissors

Using the steps of the Engineering Design Process, students worked in teams to complete the challenge.

Designs:

 

On the last day, students presented their solutions and reflected on their work.  As a group, they defined what it means to be an engineer, and the character traits needed to be successful.

 

 

Engineering 3rd Gr. @ CO

During this cycle, students learned about Engineering and the Engineering Design Process.  They learned that engineers think creatively about solving problems and responding to challenges that exist in our world.  Students also learned that engineers follow the steps of the Engineering Design Process to solve these problems:  Ask, Imagine, Plan, Create, and Improve.


Students were presented with a challenge to engineer a pet treat dispenser system. Before beginning their design, students learned about the lever (a simple machine) and gravity.  We researched different types of food and water dispensers currently available for pets.

Challenge:  Using what you know about levers and gravity, create a container for a dog treat that dispenses the treat. The container must meet the following criteria:

• The container must be large enough to hold one day’s worth of treats

• It must be able to dispense a treat when the animal steps on a lever or touches it with their nose or paw

• The treat should roll or fall out of the container into a small bowl

• Be totally enclosed so that the only way the treats are accessed is by using the lever

Materials: small cardboard box, cardboard, craft sticks, chenille stems, small springs, rubber bands, paper clips, tape, small bowl, unifix cubes to simulate dog treats and scissors

Using the steps of the Engineering Design Process, students worked in teams to complete the challenge.

Designs:

On the last day, students presented their solutions and reflected on their work.  As a group, they defined what it means to be an engineer, and the character traits needed to be successful.