Engineering Gr. 3 @ Monmouth Junction

During this cycle, students learned about Engineering and the Engineering Design Process. They learned that engineers think creatively about solving problems and responding to challenges that exist in our world.  Students also learned that engineers follow the steps of the Engineering Design Process to solve these problems:   AskImaginePlanCreate and Improve.

Students, practicing as biomedical engineers, were presented with a challenge to design and build a small-sized rescue litter (rescue basket)  prototype that would be used  to evacuate an injured person (modeled by a potato) from a remote location.  Students were given a budget of $20 to spend on their design.  Before beginning, students learned about the spinal cord and how injuries to the spinal cord can impact the human body.

Challenge: Using what you know about the spinal cord, create a rescue litter that can be used to safely evacuate an injured person from a remote wilderness location.  The rescue litter must meet the following criteria:

• Be large enough to hold an injured person (represented by a potato)

• Be stable enough to prevent further injury to the person (potato) being rescued

• Be lightweight

• Be low-cost (with-in a $20 budget)

Materials:  toothpicks, paper towels, popsicle sticks, straw, paper, aluminum foil, sponges (cute into lengthwise sections), scissors and tape

Using the steps of the Engineering Design Process, students worked in teams to complete the challenge.

Designs:


Engineering Gr. 3 @ Constable

During this cycle, students learned about Engineering and the Engineering Design Process. They learned that engineers think creatively about solving problems and responding to challenges that exist in our world.  Students also learned that engineers follow the steps of the Engineering Design Process to solve these problems:   AskImaginePlanCreate and Improve.

Students, practicing as biomedical engineers, were presented with a challenge to design and build a small-sized rescue litter (rescue basket)  prototype that would be used  to evacuate an injured person (modeled by a potato) from a remote location.  Students were given a budget of $20 to spend on their design.  Before beginning, students learned about the spinal cord and how injuries to the spinal cord can impact the human body.

Challenge: Using what you know about the spinal cord, create a rescue litter that can be used to safely evacuate an injured person from a remote wilderness location.  The rescue litter must meet the following criteria:

• Be large enough to hold an injured person (represented by a potato)

• Be stable enough to prevent further injury to the person (potato) being rescued

• Be lightweight

• Be low-cost (with-in a $20 budget)

Materials:  toothpicks, paper towels, popsicle sticks, straw, paper, aluminum foil, sponges (cute into lengthwise sections), scissors and tape

Using the steps of the Engineering Design Process, students worked in teams to complete the challenge.

Designs:


Engineering Gr. 3 @ Green Brook

During this cycle, students learned about Engineering and the Engineering Design Process. They learned that engineers think creatively about solving problems and responding to challenges that exist in our world.  Students also learned that engineers follow the steps of the Engineering Design Process to solve these problems:   AskImaginePlanCreate and Improve.

Students, practicing as biomedical engineers, were presented with a challenge to design and build a small-sized rescue litter (rescue basket)  prototype that would be used  to evacuate an injured person (modeled by a potato) from a remote location.  Students were given a budget of $20 to spend on their design.  Before beginning, students learned about the spinal cord and how injuries to the spinal cord can impact the human body.

Challenge: Using what you know about the spinal cord, create a rescue litter that can be used to safely evacuate an injured person from a remote wilderness location.  The rescue litter must meet the following criteria:

• Be large enough to hold an injured person (represented by a potato)

• Be stable enough to prevent further injury to the person (potato) being rescued

• Be lightweight

• Be low-cost (with-in a $20 budget)

Materials:  toothpicks, paper towels, popsicle sticks, straw, paper, aluminum foil, sponges (cute into lengthwise sections), scissors and tape

Using the steps of the Engineering Design Process, students worked in teams to complete the challenge.

Designs:


Engineering Gr. 3 @ Indian Fields

During this cycle, students learned about Engineering and the Engineering Design Process. They learned that engineers think creatively about solving problems and responding to challenges that exist in our world.  Students also learned that engineers follow the steps of the Engineering Design Process to solve these problems:   AskImaginePlanCreate and Improve.

Students, practicing as biomedical engineers, were presented with a challenge to design and build a small-sized rescue litter (rescue basket)  prototype that would be used  to evacuate an injured person (modeled by a potato) from a remote location.  Students were given a budget of $20 to spend on their design.  Before beginning, students learned about the spinal cord and how injuries to the spinal cord can impact the human body.

Challenge: Using what you know about the spinal cord, create a rescue litter that can be used to safely evacuate an injured person from a remote wilderness location.  The rescue litter must meet the following criteria:

• Be large enough to hold an injured person (represented by a potato)

• Be stable enough to prevent further injury to the person (potato) being rescued

• Be lightweight

• Be low-cost (with-in a $20 budget)

Materials:  toothpicks, paper towels, popsicle sticks, straw, paper, aluminum foil, sponges (cute into lengthwise sections), scissors and tape

Using the steps of the Engineering Design Process, students worked in teams to complete the challenge.

Designs:


Engineering Gr. 3 @ Cambridge

During this cycle, students learned about Engineering and the Engineering Design Process. They learned that engineers think creatively about solving problems and responding to challenges that exist in our world.  Students also learned that engineers follow the steps of the Engineering Design Process to solve these problems:     AskImaginePlanCreate and Improve.

Students, practicing as biomedical engineers, were presented with a challenge to design and build a small-sized rescue litter (rescue basket)  prototype that would be used  to evacuate an injured person (modeled by a potato) from a remote location.  Students were given a budget of $20 to spend on their design.  Before beginning, students learned about the spinal cord and how injuries to the spinal cord can impact the human body.

Challenge: Using what you know about the spinal cord, create a rescue litter that can be used to safely evacuate an injured person from a remote wilderness location.  The rescue litter must meet the following criteria:

• Be large enough to hold an injured person (represented by a potato)

• Be stable enough to prevent further injury to the person (potato) being rescued

• Be lightweight

• Be low-cost (with-in a $20 budget)

Materials:  toothpicks, paper towels, popsicle sticks, straw, paper, aluminum foil, sponges (cute into lengthwise sections), scissors and tape

Using the steps of the Engineering Design Process, students worked in teams to complete the challenge.

Designs:

Digital Literacy Gr. 4 @ Brunswick Acres

Cycle 3 focused on Language Arts and Digital Literacy.  The cycle began with a discussion about digital literacy and it’s importance in the 21st century.  Participants then learned about the elements of fables including character, setting, problem, resolution and lesson learned (moral). Students read and identified the elements of many fables.  They also performed selected fables in small groups for Reader’s Theater.  Students were then split into small teams and asked to create their own fable.  They started by thinking of a moral that they would like to include in their story, and planned their fables around that moral.   After completing their plans and drafting their stories, students used Storybird (a Web 2.0 Tool) to publish their work.   Storybird is a collaborative storytelling tool that allows students to publish short stories, chapter books and poetry.   We hope you enjoy their work!

(You will need to click on the title of the fable to open the story)

The Elephant and the Bunny

The Four Monkeys and the Crocodile

The Fox and the Hare

The Kingdom and the Crow

The Big Dangerous Ocean

The Cat Family and the Mouse

The Fox and the Bird

The Fox and the Owl Egg

 

 

Digital Literacy Gr. 3 @ Brooks Crossing

Cycle 3 focused on Language Arts and Digital Literacy.  The cycle began with a discussion about digital literacy and it’s importance in the 21st century.  Participants then learned about the elements of fables including character, setting, problem, resolution and lesson learned (moral).

Students read and identified the elements of many fables.  They also performed selected fables in small groups for Reader’s Theater.  Students were then split into small teams and asked to create their own fable.  They started by thinking of a moral that they would like to include in their story, and planned their fables around that moral.   After completing their plans and drafting their stories, students used Storybird (a Web 2.0 Tool) to publish their work.   Storybird is a collaborative storytelling tool that allows students to publish short stories, chapter books and poetry.   We hope you enjoy their work!

(You will need to click on the title of the fable to open the story)

The Fox, The Deer and the Hare

 

Digital Literacy Gr. 3 @ Monmouth Junction

Cycle 3 focused on Language Arts and Digital Literacy.  The cycle began with a discussion about digital literacy and it’s importance in the 21st century.  Participants then learned about the elements of fables including character, setting, problem, resolution and lesson learned (moral).

Students read and identified the elements of many fables.  They also performed selected fables in small groups for Reader’s Theater.  Students were then split into small teams and asked to create their own fable.  They started by thinking of a moral that they would like to include in their story, and planned their fables around that moral.   After completing their plans and drafting their stories, students used Storybird (a Web 2.0 Tool) to publish their work.   Storybird is a collaborative storytelling tool that allows students to publish short stories, chapter books and poetry.   We hope you enjoy their work!

(You will need to click on the title of the fable to open the story).

The Fox, Lion and The Bear

 

Digital Literacy Gr. 3 @ Greenbrook

Cycle 3 focused on Language Arts and Digital Literacy.  The cycle began with a discussion about digital literacy and it’s importance in the 21st century.  Participants then learned about the elements of fables including character, setting, problem, resolution and lesson learned (moral).

Students read and identified the elements of many fables.  They also performed selected fables in small groups for Reader’s Theater.  Students were then split into small teams and asked to create their own fable.  They started by thinking of a moral that they would like to include in their story, and planned their fables around that moral.   After completing their plans and drafting their stories, students used Storybird (a Web 2.0 Tool) to publish their work.   Storybird is a collaborative storytelling tool that allows students to publish short stories, chapter books and poetry.   We hope you enjoy their work!

(You will need to click on the title of the fable to open the story).

The Owl and the Wolves

 

The Cat, Fox and Snake

 

The Rabbit and the Reflection

Digital Literacy Gr. 3 @ Cambridge

Cycle 3 focused on Language Arts and Digital Literacy.  The cycle began with a discussion about digital literacy and it’s importance in the 21st century.  Participants then learned about the elements of fables including character, setting, problem, resolution and lesson learned (moral).

Students read and identified the elements of many fables.  They also performed selected fables in small groups for Reader’s Theater.  Students were then split into small teams and asked to create their own fable.  They started by thinking of a moral that they would like to include in their story, and planned their fables around that moral.   After completing their plans and drafting their stories, students used Storybird (a Web 2.0 Tool) to publish their work.   Storybird is a collaborative storytelling tool that allows students to publish short stories, chapter books and poetry.   We hope you enjoy their work!

(You will need to click on the title of the fable to open the story).

The Foolish Deer

 

The Squirrel and the Crocodile

 

The Greedy Wolf

 

The Famine In the Forest

 

The Fish, Bird and Deer