BLUE- The Snowball Effect OEQ

When Angela decides to take responsibility for the broken window, she imagines how her classmates will treat her.

  • What does Angela imagine her classmates will do?  Why?
  • Do you think Angela’s expectations were realistic?  Why or why not?

Use details and examples from the story to support your response.

10 Responses to “BLUE- The Snowball Effect OEQ”

  1. Raghav says:

    In “The Snowball effect,” Angela decides to take responsibility for the broken window. Mr. Phillips, Angela’s history teacher, was late for coming to class. So her classmates decided to play football in the room. Angela didn’t play football with her peers. She learned that “from with two older brothers, it’s that you should never play football indoors.” The ball found its way through the window. The window broke into many pieces. Out of nowhere Mr. Phillips appeared. He asked who broke the window. Angela decided to raise her hand. She thought it would protect her classmates because since she was an honors student Mr. Phillips might go easy on her. She also thought it was a way for her classmates to respect her. Angela imagines her classmates “would probably see me as a hero.”
    I don’t think Angela’s expectations are realistic because instead of a little punishment she expected, Angela got a lot of chores to pay off the broken window, and three days of in school suspension. This reminds of the time when I read the book “The Lightning Thief.” In the book a goat like person, Grover, choose to protect his friends, Annabeth and Percy, and leave himself in the underworld in order for his them to finish their quest. In conclusion, it’s always best to tell the truth.
    :smile: :razz:

  2. Gaurav says:

    Angela decides to take the blame that she threw the football threw the window. She imagines that she will be a hero. Angela’s brothers were playing with a football inside a classroom. Unfortunately, the football went through the window. Mr. Phillips walks in the classroom when the window broke. Nobody confesses about who threw the football. Angela thinks that her classmates will praise her, so she takes the blame. She also thinks that her classmates will be saved from doing a lot of work that Mr. Phillips was about to hand out. Angela even says, “I pictured them hoisting me up on their shoulders and chanting my name: Angela! Angela!”

    I think that Angela’s expectations were unrealistic. She is not going to get so much praise that her classmates would lift her up on their shoulders. I remember a time when I made a touchdown in football. Nobody praised me. In conclusion, Angela breaks the window and does not get praised for what she has done for her classmates.

    I’m done!
    :razz:

  3. Palavi D. (Jellybean) says:

    :arrow: ‘When Angela decides to take responsibility for the broken window, she imagines how her classmates will treat her.’ Angela imagines that her classmates will praise her for her helpfulness. She expects them too. Angela’s day was normal and fine before fifth period rolled around. Her classmates thought it would be fun to play football in the room, Angela strongly disagrees. minutes later, the window is broken due to the football going through, and Mr. Philips hurries into the room and asks for confession. Angela, only wanted the benefit of no homework and higher position in school, lied of being the red-handed culprit. Mr. Philips is suspicious at first, but agrees later on. Angela does not get her full pay though, she gets scolding from the principal and her mom, loads of chores, in-school suspension and not one classmate thanked her. Angela thinks she would rather do the homework rather than the chores and labor.

    I personally don’t think Angela was realistic about her friends congratulating her, she was even wrong to think so. She was only doing this for personal gain. I can connect this story to an Indian movie that I watched a couple years ago. the main character, while playing cricket, knocks the ball into a neighbors window. His neighbor isn’t pleased. In conclusion, Angela takes blame for something she doesn’t do. She has to suffer.

  4. Shefali says:

    Nice OEQ Gaurav!!!!!!!!!! Nice connection. :smile: :smile:

  5. Matt K. says:

    When Anjela decides to take responsobility for the broken window she imagines heself being a hero. The class was going to do a risky thingby playing football in the classroom. The football flew across the room and shattered the glass. The class remained silent , knowing nowone would want to say one word. Mr.Phillips marched into the classroomand was not very pleased. Anjela imaginedthat she would take the blame for it and be a real hero. But that was not how it came out and she was sentenced to three days in school suspension. Her classmates didn’t even care that she took the blame, they were just happpy that theyt didn’t get into trouble.
    Anjela thought that she would save her classmates but those were just too high of expectations. Realisticly the teacher would really think that you broke the window. Now she will get really harsh punnishments. This reminds me of the time when my class did something bad so someone had to confess and I did even though I didn’t do it. It wasn’t as harch as breaking so I didn’t get into a lot of trouble. In conclussion, Anjela imagined her classmates thinking that she was a hero, but her expectations were not very realistic because she got punnished. :mrgreen: :mrgreen: :mrgreen: :evil:

  6. Ramya S. says:

    :o :o :o :o :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :idea: :idea: :idea: :cry: :cry: :cool:

    When Angela takes responsibility for the broken window, she has some pride in herself. this is because, she believes that her classmates will consider her as a hero. Also, she thinks that everyone will respect her because she saved them from extra writing homework assignments. For example, Angela says, “If I confessed the crime, my classmates would see as a hero from saving them from all the homework. In other words, Angela is expecting some appreciation from her aquaintances. Also, Angela pictures that they will be hoisting her up on there shoulders and chanting her name. Lastly, Angela expects them to act with some thankfulness because she has saved her whole class from something they all try to avoid, Homework! So Angela imagines her class to encouraging her because she saved them all from a lot of homework.

    I don’t think Angela’s expectations were realistic because she was only soing this for her personal gain. Also, Angela was expecting too much from a class who could not even be honest and confess their own mistakes. Similarly, my friends expectations have been realistic when she lied to the teacher to get her friend out of trouble. She thought it would make it better, but in the end she had to suffer. In conclusion, I think Angela should have a limit to her expectations and realize that honesty is important.

    :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol:

  7. Farhan says:

    comment by Farhan

    Angela takes responsibility for breaking the window because she imagines that her classmates will treat her like a hero. She was in the classroom and some people began to toss the football around. Angela knew that it was a bad idea, and that something would go wrong. “Now if there is one thing I’ve learned from living with two older brothers, it’s you should never play football indoors.” Angela didn’t want to ruin the fun, so she played along, just until Mr. Phillips came in. Suddenly, the football went through the window and broke it. Mr. Phillips came in and when no one confessed, he threatened to give extra essays to everyone, everyday. Angela couldn’t manage any more work, and the other students would not confess, so she falsely confessed the crime. Angela expected glory from the other students from saving them, but got none.
    I do not think that Angela’s expectations were realistic. She expected to be treated like a hero, but if the students did that the teachers would know that something was up and find out the truth. “Worst of all, I hardly got a pat on the back from my classmates, let alone the hero’s celebration I thought I deserved.” Also, kids do not give glory to people who save them. They are just cowardly in a situation like this. This kind of like what happened in Diary of a Wimpy Kid. A dictionary was stolen from the teacher’s desk, and the teacher would keep the whole class in for recess until the thief came forward. Bullies tried to find the culprit, and a few people confessed, but they just confessed because they cracked under the pressure. They found the culprit, and someone else tried to put it an the desk, but the teacher caught him and he was punished. In conclusion, Angela thought that she would be treated as a hero for getting the other kids free from punishment, and I think that her expectations were not realistic.

    Well I’m done with this thing

    Oh, and Ms.Zicha I did the Baseball in April OEQ on The Stone OEQ page

  8. Jennifer says:

    When Angela decides to take responsibility for the broken window, she imagines how her classmates will treat her. In Angela’s point of view, her classmates treated her like a hero. She had taken blame for something that wasn’t done by her. She had watched the ball bounce back and forth the classroom, until it smashed through the window. Mr. Phillips comes in and asks who destroyed the window. “Mr. Phillips tapped his foot, his face reddening like a tomato.” That’s when Angela imagines how her classmates might treat her, and takes the blame.
    Angela’s expectations were above and beyond what anyone could hope for. Even if her classmates found her actions heroic, they would only thank her in a polite way. This can be related to a time when my cousin and I took blame for what my sister did. She usually confesses, but this time we had to take all the blame and punishment. Nothing can always be how you want it to.

  9. mason says:

    When Angela decides to take responsibility for the broken window, she imagines how her classmates will treat her. Angela imagines her classmates will cheer for her and that Mr. Phillips won’t give her the punishment. Angela thinks this because her classmates would think she is a hero, and Mr. Phillips’s favorite student is Angela who is an honor role student. Everyone was in 5th period class, and Angela’s teacher was late. Since Mr. Phillips, Angela’s history teacher, was late, the boys in the class started to throw a football. Angela knew not to do this because her brothers got in trouble all the time for playing ball in the house. Two seconds before Mr. Phillips came in all you could hear was, CRASH!!! When Mr. Phillips came in and saw it he asked who did it and no one confessed. Angela knew she didn’t do it but said she did hoping her class would think she is a hero. The entire opposite thing happened to Angela. Her mom was furious when she found out.

    I think Angela’s Expectations were realistic in some ways because her class might have thought she was a hero. I can relate to this because at a camp the boys got in trouble and no one would confess to doing it. That is why I think Angela’s expectations were some what realistic. :grin: :grin: :twisted: :twisted: :!: :cool:

  10. Ally M. says:

    When Angela takes the blame for the window, she expected her classmates to treat her differently. Everyone in her class is throwing the football around. Then, the football slips out of someones hand and crashes into the window. To avoid an extra homework assignment every night, Angela takes the blame for something she didn’t do. “I pictured the hoisting me up on their shoulders and chanting my name.” Angela expects this because she would be saving them from more homework and punishment.
    I think Angela’s expectations were realistic because it’s not like they’re building a statue in honor of her. This reminds me of the book Crash. When Crash makes fun of Penn he expects everyone to laugh and tease with him. But instead everyone thinks what he did was wrong and immature. In closing, Angela shouldn’t have taken the blame for something she didn’t do.

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