ORANGE- The Snowball Effect OEQ

When Angela decides to take responsibility for the broken window, she imagines how her classmates will treat her.

  • What does Angela imagine her classmates will do?  Why?
  • Do you think Angela’s expectations were realistic?  Why or why not?

Use details and examples from the story to support your response.

28 Responses to “ORANGE- The Snowball Effect OEQ”

  1. Nikita says:

    Yeah, I’m the first one to post! :razz: ;-) :smile: :grin: :cool: :!: :!: :!: :!: :!: :!: :!: :!: :!: :!: :!: :!: :!: :!: :!: :!:
    (clear throat) Get ready for Nikita’s awesome OEQ response!! :mrgreen: :mrgreen: :mrgreen: :!: :!: :!: :!: :!: :twisted: :twisted: :twisted: :twisted: :twisted:

    “When Angela decides to take responsibility for the broken window, she imagines how her classmates will treat her.” Angela imagines her classmates will think of her as a hero as she churns the consequences of her classmate’s behavior. Mr. Jones, the class history teacher had been late to class. As a result, the students thought it would be fun to throw a football around. Angela, having the experience of playing football indoors with her brothers, but not wanting to ruin all of the fun, reluctantly agreed. Two minutes before Mr. Jones hurriedly rushed into the classroom, the football whizzed through the window which shattered to pieces. Mr. Jones rushed into the classroom and turned tomato red with anger when mo one confessed to the broken window. Mr. Jones finally decided to punish the class with, “additional essays each night from now until the end of the semester.” Angela lies and says she broke the window because she was blinded by the glory. She thought her classmates would call her a hero. But she was wrong. “Worst of all, I hardly got a pat on the back from my classmates let alone the hero’s celebration I thought I deserved.
    I think Angela’s expectations were realistic because she took all the blame of her classmates when she was even reluctant to play. I think Angela should have gotten some glory from her lie I can connect this to a time when, during naptime in kindergarten, our teacher had to run some errands around the building. While we were “sleeping” she left the classroom. The class urged someone to turn on the light. My friend reluctantly did it. When the teacher came back, she asked who turned the light on. Everyone’s hand except mine and my friend’s flew up and pointed to my friend. She was too shocked to say a word. Because I felt sorry for her, I took the blame. I was grounded in my room, not able to watch T.V. for a week. I expected my friend to at least say “thank you”, but she didn’t utter a word. All in all, being truthful is always better than telling a lie.

    THANK YOU PEOPLE OF ORANGE READING CLASS AND MS. ZICHA :!: :!: :!:

  2. Arvind S. says:

    When Angela decides to take responsibility for the broken window, she imagines how her classmates will treat her. He thinks her peers will treat her like some kind of hero. See, her teacher, Mr. Phillips, was late coming to class. Many of her peers want to play to toss the football around, and Angela thinks,” Why should I ruin the fun?” So see watched the ball get tossed around. But then the unavoidable happened- the football hit the window and the window cracked! Mr. Phillips arrived a second later, too! Everybody dared to take the final breath. At this point, Angela is thinking two things: one is I can’t take another essay, everyday until December! I already take extra classes! Two is: if I take the blame everyone will worship me! As she thinks,” They probably will hoist me on their shoulders and chant my name! Angela! Angela!” So that is why she takes the blame.
    I do not think that Angela’s thoughts were realistic. This is a school and it seems like these kids have nothing to do. So they wouldn’t care if they had an extra piece of homework each night. One time I got myself in a similar situation. My brother and I were tossing a baseball around and we accidently broke a lamp. My mom ran to the noise when she heard the noise. She started yelling and I thought,” If I take the blame my brother will love me! I have always wanted that!” So I took the blame. My mom sent me to my room and later grounded me. I sat there thinking,” Was it wise to take the blame?” I even heard my mom say when she thought I was out of earshot,” Thank god you didn’t do that.” My brother never touched the subject again. So remember to never take the blame on something you never even did.

  3. Gopa says:

    Hello Nikita. Loved your response. I really like your connection… it was all creative ;-) :smile: :grin: :twisted:

  4. Arvind S. says:

    Nice OEQ, Nikita! I like it!

  5. victoria (yello jello) says:

    ;-) ;-) NNICE JJOB PEOPLE! ;-) :mrgreen: :mrgreen: :grin: :grin: :lol: :lol: :roll: :roll: :roll: :roll:

  6. Gopa says:

    When Angela considered lying about the broken window, she pictured herself as a strong, courageous person who will take the blame and save the day. :mrgreen: However, when she really did confess, that was not the case. :| It all started when two boys decided that it will be fun to play football indoors before Mr. Phillips comes in. :roll: Unfortunately, one of the boys clumsily threw the ball and it hit the window. :oops: The window shattered just as Mr. Phillips came in. Mr. Phillips was furious :evil: and threatened the class that he will give the class extra papers to do every day if no one confessed. Angela was part of the honor roll :idea: and she couldn’t do those essays. Imagining a reward for her bravery, she lied that she did it. Everyone is shocked. :shock: And the worst part was, despite her heroic act, no one bothered to congratulate her or thank her. :sad:
    I, personally, do not think Angela’s imagination was realistic. :???: No one would congratulate her. No student would want to take any chances of being caught thanking the girl who “committed the crime”. If that is the case, then they will be caught too, and maybe even blamed. :| I can relate this to a time when my sister and I were playing frisbee. This was no regular frisbee though; this was a GIANT frisbee. :twisted: It was almost the size of me! :shock: We were tossing the huge toy around when my sister threw it too high up. It got stuck in the huge tree in out backyard. :oops: We needed to attach two broomsticks together to barely touch it. :mrgreen: :lol: My mom was annoyed :x and she asked who did it. I took the blame for it, even though this was not the case. Luckily my mom was in a good mood :cool: and she only grounded me for 5 days. I was only rewarded by a quick “Thanks!” from my sister. Now I realized that its best to tell the truth :idea: . I could have gotten into a huge pickle :mrgreen: :mrgreen: . Angela learned this important life lesson and she won’t make this lesson again.

    HOPE YOU LIKED MY OEQ ORANGE CLASS AND MS. ZICHA :!: :!: ;-) :| :x :twisted: :smile: :shock:
    :sad: :roll: :razz: :oops: :o :mrgreen: :lol: :grin: :evil: :cry: :cool: :arrow: :???: :?: :!:

  7. Gopa says:

    Great job Arvind!! Your connection was really strong :idea: :mrgreen: .

  8. Shefali says:

    nice oeq Nikita!!!!!! I agree with everyone and I like your connection. :!: :!: :!: :!: :!: :smile: :smile: :smile:

  9. Ayush says:

    :shock: :idea: why dont i post an oeq? :roll: don’t you roll your eyes at me :!:

    When Angela decides to take responsibility for the broken window, she imagines how her classmates will treat her. Mr.Phillips was late for class so some students decided to toss around a football. It accidentally crashed through the window, and when nobody fessed up, Angela decided to take the blame, even though she hadn’t broken the window. she was an honors student and already had extra work to do, and she didn’t need anymore. She thought her classmates will treat her like a hero and reward her and praise her for saving them from punishment.
    I don’t think Angela’s expectations were very realistic. she did deserve more thanks from her classmates thatn she actually received, but she shouldn’t have expected to become most popular kid in the class because she took the blame. The situation Angela was in reminds me of a similar on i was in. Me and some friends were playing around with a Phlat Ball in one of their backyards. it slipped once and sailed straight towards the window. the window didn’t break because it was open, but the fine china behind it wasn’t so lucky. it broke. I knew that once my friend’s mom found out, his life was over. So I took the blame. it wasn’t the smartest move, but his parents eventually found out that it was actually him, so I got ot of trouble. If Angela had been honest, she wouldn’t have been in that mess. It is best to tell the truth.

  10. Matthew G. says:

    I remeber to post my OEQ!!!!1 :cool: :mrgreen: :grin: Matt Grisley
    When Angela decides to take responsibility for the broken window, she imagines how her classmates will treat her. Angela thinks that her classmates will think she’s heroic from saving them from getting into any trouble. She thinks that her classmates will respect her and thank her but they did nothing.
    No, I don’t think Angela’s expectations were realistic. Even if she got appreciation from her classmates it’s still not worth it. She gets three days of in school suspension, can’t call any friend for a month, has to help set the dinner table for two months, and has to do chores until she pays off for the broken window. Imagine, all that to save your classmates. A connection I have is when I had a sleep over my friends and I were throwing the football in my basement. We keep these plates with our favorite football team on it on the wall. When we were throwing the ball we broke one of the plates. I had to pay for another, I’ll tell you that’s not worth throwing the football around. In conclusion, Angela takes the blame for the broken window and still doesn’t get the respect she imagined and shouldn’t have done it.

  11. Anjali says:

    “When Angela decides to take responsibility for the broken window, she imagines how her classmates will treat her.” Angela imagines that her peers will think of her as a hero. She expected them to lift her on their shoulders for saving them from extra work. Since she didn’t commit the crime, she thinks her actions would look heroic by taking the fall for something she didn’t do. In the beginning, Angela’s day was going normally, but when fifth period approached, so did trouble. Even though she hadn’t said anything to ruin the fun, she knew from her experience with her brothers that it was not wise to participate in the activity. Then when the teacher arrived, he wasn’t pleased with the situation. That’s when Angela took the blame unnecessarily, and imagined the worship she’d receive by her classmates.
    I believe Angela’s thinking was somewhat realistic, because as a kid you expect your friends to thank you and be there for you. “I pictured them hoisting me up on their shoulders and chanting my name.” If I were Angela I probably wouldn’t have hoped for this much appreciation, but just a bit of it at least. This reminds me of when I once saved my friend from a teacher’s grip by telling a white lie, then she didn’t even seem to care about the effort I had made to assist her! Additionally, this is similar to a book I read called Trapped in the Death Cave how the two boys faced conflicts in their friendship. Later on, they were resolved during a dangerous crisis. In the end, I understood that Angela thought her friends would acknowledge when she got them out of that pickle. Unfortunately, she was wrong to lie for them. I would’ve thought my friends would do the same for me, but after reading this passage looks like I’ll be careful just for future reference!

  12. Sonali says:

    Hi everyone! here is my OEQ response…… :mrgreen: :cool:

    When Angela decides to take responsibility for the broken window, she imagines how her classmates will treat her. Angela imagines her classmates seeing her as a hero from saving them work and she pictures them hoisting her up on their shoulders, chanting “Angela! Angela!”. In paragraph 9, Angela thinks that her classmates will really like her for her “noble” deed. When Angela’s classmates broke the window with the football and had to face their history teacher, Mr. Phillips, Angela knows that they are scared. Everyone was silent when Mr. Phillips asked, “Who is responsible for this?” in paragraph 4.

    I think that Angela’s expectations were realistic because that was what was expected of her classmates. Her classmates should have at least thanked her, if not treated her like a hero. I think Angela’s fantasies about being lifted onto their shoulders was unrealistic but it was naturally expected that her classmates thank her. Once, when me and my friends were playing soccer, my friend accidentally kicked the ball into my neighbor’s garden. My neighbor came outside and asked, “Who did it?” I took the blame for my friend and got into huge trouble with my mom. My friend never thanked me for saving them. I can relate to how Angela felt. In conclusion, I think that Angela wanted her classmates to treat her like a hero. This was quite a realistic expectation. In paragraph 9, Angela fantasizes about her treatment, but does not get the expected results in paragraph 15. Even though the “hero’s welcome” was unrealistic, her classmates should have at least thanked her.

  13. Ajay S. says:

    When Angela decides to take responsibility for the broken window, she imagines how her classmates will treat her. Angele thinks that they will stand up for her. Instead they don’t. Angele’s classmate don’t want to take the blame. They don’t want to get punished. They don’t even give her a pat on the back or say thank you. Angele thought she would be the hero of her class.

    I think that Angela’s exceptions were realistic. I think they were because your friends or classmates should back you up. They shouldn’t just leave her because they don’t want get in trouble. Also her mom would get mad at her. But here friends helped her. This reminds me of me getting in trouble for no reason. this kid blamed it on me.
    In conclusion, Angela’s classmates didn’t stick up for here. Also the exception didn’t come out good. Angela had a tough time.

    :mrgreen: :mrgreen: :mrgreen: :mrgreen: Thank you :evil: :evil: :evil: :evil:

  14. Michael H says:

    When Angela decides to take responsibility for the broken window, she imagines how her classmates would treat her. Some of Angela’s classmates were playing with a football and broke a window. Mr. Philips said that they will get extra homework each day of the semester. Angela lies and gets 3 days of in-school suspension and has to pay for a new window. Her mother agrees to pay for a the window, but Angela has to do chores for the month. Angela expected her classmates to say that she is brave at the end of class, but to her surprise no one does anything. She thought that they will be grateful for confessing, but everyone was shocked.

    No, I don’t think her expectations were realistic. I think this because she doesn’t know if her classmates would call her a hero, and what the punishment would be. This reminds me of when someone did something bad on the computer in 3rd grade. The teacher asked who did it. Since no one confessed, we were banned from the computers for the whole year. In conclusion, Angela’s choice of confessing to a crime she didn’t commit was a bad choice.

  15. Chanina W. says:

    Chanina’s OEQ :cool:

    When Angela decides to take responsibility of the broken window, she imagines how her classmates will treat her for being their hero. She pictures what her classmates will do after taking the crime, but regrettably, her expectations were not met. :evil:

    Angela visualizes what her classmates will do for her being heroic: “I pictured them hoisting me up on their shoulders and chanting my name: ‘Angela! Angela!’” her hopes she thought could happen because she salvaged her fellow peers from History Class from having extra homework every night till the semester ends: “If I confessed my crime, my classmates would probably see me as a hero for saving them all that work.”

    Angela’s anticipations can be realistic because her “classmates would probably see…” her “as a hero.” They were about to receive “additional essay s each night from now until the end of the semester.” :!: :o Alas, her acquaintances only worry about themselves and didn’t praise Angela’s little lie. :cry:

    Angela decides to take responsibility for the broken window. She visualizes her classmates admiring, but it didn’t occur. :cry:

  16. Gopa says:

    Awesome job Sonali!! :smile: :smile: :smile: :smile: :smile: :smile: :smile: :smile: :smile: :smile: :smile: :smile: :smile: :smile: :smile: :smile: :smile: :smile: :smile: :smile: :smile: :smile:

  17. Sajan says:

    “This tiny box cannot explain how I feel about blogging!” –Sajan P. :cool:

    Angela imagines that her classmates would consider her a hero for taking the blame on the broken window. She imagines this because when Mr. Phillips said he would assign essays for the rest of the semester, she confessed to a crime she didn’t do. She could picture her classmates chanting, “Angela! Angela!” Also, Mr. Phillips liked her, so she thought he would go easy on her. Also, Angela didn’t think if there would be consequences for breaking the window.
    I think that Angela’s expectations weren’t realistic. I think this because the student who actually broke the window might be feeling guilty and upset. Also, some students might call Angela a “liar” and tell her to stop being a “teacher’s pet”. This is like the time where, in the 4th grade classroom, I took a magnifying glass and aimed it at a computer screen. A short while later, the screen’s colors got scrambled and was totally damaged. I suddenly ran away when the teacher walked by, but another student took the blame and got sent to the computer teachers. Immediately, I confessed to the crime and ran down to the computer teachers before they could punish an innocent student. They were surprised I would do anything like that and called my parents to tell them I damaged school property. As a result, I got sent straight to my room after school and was grounded for a week. Also, I couldn’t use any computer until I could earn my teacher’s trust back. I can relate to Angela, and how when sometimes I take the blame, the right thing to do turns out to be a punishment for me.
    In closing, Angela’s expectations of taking the blame was a pat on the back, but instead was rewarded with punishments and chores.

  18. Anusha B says:

    :grin: :razz: “When Angela decides to take responsibility for the broken window, she imagines how her classmates will treat her.” Angela imagines that her classmates will think she was all heroic and hold her on their shoulders chanting her name. She thinks they would do this to thank Angela for the responsibility that she has taken for them. :roll:
    :lol: I don’t think expectations were completely realistic because even though sometimes a situation like this could occur, when people would hold her on their shoulders chanting her name like that, but its too much of a risky chance to take.
    Once I was in a situation like this when I was playing with my friends. One day when we were all playing outside, we saw a bouncy mattress laying by the dumpster ready to be thrown away. One of my friends had an idea of picking it up and did. Then, after a while, the manager came by and asked which one of us had the idea to pick it up. We were all stunned of what to say. So I opened my mouth fumbling for words then finally said that I took the mattress from the dumpster. My friends were looking at me all shocked, but the manager just smiled and took the mattress away and told me not to do it again. That was not a very big punishment at all but anyway, in conclusion, never lye about things like this or about anything and consequences will find its way to the real culprit.

  19. Anusha B says:

    nice work Nikita. I loved it!

  20. Sam C. says:

    Hey Orange Class! Here is my OEQ response :razz:

    “When Angela decides to take responsibility for the broken window, she imagines how her classmates will treat her.” Angelo imagines that her classmates with hoist her up and start chanting her name. I think that Angela thinks this because she thinks if she lies about breaking the window then her classmates will see her as some sort of hero.
    I think that Angela’s expectations aren’t very realistic because nobody would want to hoist Angela up while the teacher is standing there already mad. Also, all that Angela did was lie and everyone would think that she likes her classmates more than herself. To sum it up, it is always important to always tell the truth because you never know what the consequences will be. :grin: :grin: :grin:

  21. Victoria T. says:

    When Angela decides to take the responsibility for the blame of the broken window, she imagines how her classmates will treat her. Angela thinks that her classmates will hoist her up into the air and shout her name. She imagines this because she’s taking the blame for something she didn’t do, so everyone will be thankful that Angela saved them from doing an extra essay assignment. In addition, Angela is an honor student, so in that case Mr. Phillips, the teacher whose window was broken, will go easy with her punishment. Sadly, that didn’t happen. Something completely different happened instead.
    I don’t think Angela’s vision was not correct because nobody would praise her for lying just to get out of writing an extra assignment. Second, she only confessed because she thought she would get a hero’s celebration and to not write and extra essay each night. Lastly, why would anybody extol Angela for lying? That’s just absurd! This reminds me of the time when my brother (or was it?) spilled baby powder in the bathroom sink. My mom told us we’d stay in the bathroom until one of us would confess. After tolerating my brother’s begging, I confessed to the crime. None of my siblings said thanks, and before dinner, my dad and I went for a walk, where he explained about lying. I wasn’t happy with either turnout, the walk before dinner, nor the congratulations from my sister and brother. In conclusion, Angela imagines herself as a hero if she confesses to the crime, but instead gets an endless list of chores.
    :mrgreen:

  22. Nikita (I like chocolate!!!) says:

    Oh yea, Forgot to add this in the end…..my connection was fake!!!Ha ha ha I made you think it was real!!yeah I was getting writer’s block….. :mrgreen: :lol:

  23. Nikita (I like chocolate!!!) says:

    What I said to Gopa, My connection was fake…I had writer’s block…But I made you believe it!YES!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

  24. Nikita (I like chocolate!!!) says:

    Hey Ms. Zicha you are on!!!!!
    How are you feeling????????????????????????

  25. kelli.zicha says:

    Hi Nikita, I am feeling better thanks ;-)
    I miss you guys!

  26. Gopa says:

    I make up all my connections because I can’t really think of any to suit my writing :mrgreen: :mrgreen: . I figured you would too.

  27. Braden says:

    When Angela decides to take responsibility for the broken window, she imagines how her classmates will treat her. Angela imagines royalty, pure respect, as if she were the queen of England. She imagined crowd surfing and everybody patting her on the back.

    Angela’s expectations were completely unrealistic. I once took the blame for something that I didn’t do and I ended up getting screamed at by my mom. That whole experience was not worth it and i advise the rest of you to fess up and don’t lie. Take responsibility for your actions and remember, think before you act.

  28. Nick P. says:

    When Angela decides to take responsibility for the broken window, she imagines how her classmates will treat her. Angela imagines that her classmates would view her as a hero because she saved them from writing essays every night for the rest of the semester. Mr. Phillips was late to class and a few of Angela’s classmates decided to throw a football around the room. Then, the window broke.

    I think that Angela’s expectations were somewhat realistic because she saved them from doing work and they were probably relieved. On the other hand, they are probably puzzled about why she would do that for them. This is like a time when I was playing kickball at recess and one of my friends kicked the kickball so hard that it went through a classroom window. The teacher immediately came outside and asked who did it. Instead of me lying and saying that it was me, the person who did it confessed and got in trouble but he did the right thing.

    In conclusion, when Angela said that it was her who threw the football through the window, she imagined that her classmates would view her as a hero. She thought that because she saved them from writing essays every night for the rest of the semester. I think that her expectations were somewhat reasonable because she saved them from writing essays but they also would be puzzled about why she did that for them.

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